April 4 - May 10, 2014

Dirt and Not Copper

Lorna Macintyre and Zin Taylor

Installation view of Constellation of Forms and Processes, Galerie Catherine Bastide, Brussels, 2013. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis.

Installation view of Constellation of Forms and Processes, Galerie Catherine Bastide, Brussels, 2013. Photo: Isabelle Arthuis.

Opening Reception:
7pm, Thursday, April 3rd

Dirt and Not Copper is an exhibition featuring work by Lorna Macintyre (Glasgow) and Zin Taylor (Brussels) that explores the connections between objects, narrative, and methods of storytelling. Reflecting on the aestheticised, and often ironic role that objects play in the building of narrative within an exhibition, the project examines the ways in which narrative is obscured through the process of making.

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April 4 & 5, 2014

There are reasons for looking and feeling and thinking about things that are invisible

A two day event on New Narratives in Art Writing.*

New Narratives, Left to right: Eileen Myles, Jacob Wren, Maria Fusco and Lynne Tillman.

New Narratives, Left to right: Eileen Myles, Jacob Wren, Maria Fusco and Lynne Tillman.

Building on the West Coast literary movement known as New Narrative, There are reasons for looking and feeling and thinking about things that are invisible brings together four writers at the edge of literary and contemporary art writing in the voices of Maria Fusco, Eileen Myles, Lynne Tillman, and Jacob Wren.

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June 7 – July 26, 2014

AND HE BUILT A CROOKED HOUSE

Lauren Cherry and Max Springer, Nicolas Sassoon and Valérian Goalec

andhebuiltacrookedhouse

Opening Reception:
7pm, Friday, June 6, 2014

AND HE BUILT A CROOKED HOUSE is an exhibition of work by Lauren Cherry and Max Springer (Los Angeles), Valérian Goalec (Brussels) and Nicolas Sassoon (Biarritz/Vancouver) that explores French theorist Georges Bataille’s concept of Base Materialism. The exhibition takes its title from a short story by Robert A. Heinlein involving a house newly designed by the protagonist Quintus Teal that, as a result of an unexpected earthquake, challenges the traditional structure of linear architecture. The house amalgamates into a 4-dimensional object which renders it into a baseless foundation that can only be described as a mixed blob of multi-functional provisions.

Known as a tesseract or hypercube this architectural structure might illustrate Bataille’s Base Materialism, first articulated in the 1920s, that objected to the existing hierarchical structure of politics and instead argued for a disorienting and active flux through the “injection” of an active base matter. Through an overlapping uncertainty of sculpture and projection, Goalec, Sassoon, Cherry and Springer have been asked to develop a collaborative exhibition that destabilizes each artwork in an attempt to encounter Bataille’s radically disorienting freedom.