Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)

Feb 21, 2015 – Feb 20, 2016

Ken Lum

Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold), Ken Lum (2015). Photo: Dennis Ha

Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold), Ken Lum (2015). Photo: Dennis Ha

Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold) by Canadian artist Ken Lum is the first commissioned work presented at 221A’s new outdoor site as part of the Semi-Public program at 271 Union Street. The installation is a 1:3 scale replica of a mass-produced, Vancouver architectural style of homes known as the “Vancouver Special”, popularized from 1965 to 1985 with an estimated 10,000 homes built.

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City Fabric

August 1–September 30, 2015

Rebecca Bayer, Matthew Soules

Courtesy of the artists.

Courtesy of the artists.

City Fabric is a project by Vancouver-based artist Rebecca Bayer and artist/architect Matthew Soules, commissioned in partnership with Burrard Arts Foundation. The installation is made up of construction safety netting, a material designed for temporary use that has become iconic in Vancouver—a city that since the 1980s has been under intensive real estate speculation and development.

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Maraya: Sisyphean Cart

August 4–29, 2015

M. Simon Levin, Glen Lowry, Henry Tsang

Sisyphean Cart. Courtesy of the artists.

Sisyphean Cart. Courtesy of the artists.

Maraya: Sisyphean Cart is a mobile ‘sousveillance’ cart that conducts a site-specific participatory spatial investigation of Vancouver’s False Creek and the Dubai Marina. It premiered at the 20th International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA) in Dubai in November 2014, and completes its second leg for ISEA 2015 in Vancouver. This custom-designed hand-drawn cart is mounted with an automated pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera and pulled along the both waterfront seawall paths. Imagery produced by the skyscraper-facing camera will provide alternative perspectives on this built environment, from vantage points that intentionally torque a conventional street-view perspective.

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