Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)

Feb 21, 2015 – Feb 20, 2016

Ken Lum

Detail of "Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)", Ken Lum, 2015

Detail of "Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold)", Ken Lum, 2015

Opening Reception – Saturday, February 21, 2–4pm with brief remarks by Brian McBay and Ken Lum

Vancouver Especially (A Vancouver Special scaled to its property value in 1973, then increased by 8 fold) by Canadian artist Ken Lum is the first commissioned work presented at 221A’s new outdoor site as part of the Semi-Public program at 271 Union Street. The installation is a 1:3 scale replica of a mass-produced, Vancouver architectural style of homes known as the “Vancouver Special”, popularized from 1965 to 1985 with an estimated 10,000 homes built. The scale of the artwork is determined by the $45,000 artwork production budget, comparable to the value of a Vancouver Special in the 1970s. Buying a Vancouver Special with that budget today would be tiny in size (a small relief in the front of the platform shows the actual scale), thus the artwork was multiplied eightfold. Therefore, the artwork would be most appropriately considered an ‘enlargement’ of accepted value.

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No Monologue

January 17 – March 14, 2015

Dustin Brons, Gabi Dao, Kara Hansen, Scott Kemp, Emma Metcalfe Hurst, Ellis Sam, Zebulon Zang

“Did we just collaborate?” (2014)  found Craigslist image and caption for No Monologue

“Did we just collaborate?” (2014) found Craigslist image and caption for No Monologue

If you help me make a decision, that is a collaboration.

Long tables can be located in the politics of congregation by looking at one occasion when Danish furniture designer Piet Hein tried to intervene in peace negotiations after the Vietnam War.

Hein contacted the parties after he heard a rumour that the delegates could not continue because they were in dispute about the shape of the table. He offered his design—the super-elliptical table—believing that the elongated circle would quell hierarchies suggested in a rectangle, or avoid the overt utopianism of a round table. Shortly after, negotiations started up again, not around Hein’s table, but likely after the diplomats abandoned the shape of the table as the foremost pressing subject—though pressing enough to summon a hiatus on political arbitration.

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Big Beige Eyes

November 7 – December 4, 2014

Kalli Niedoba

Installation shot including Hold on, Untitled (smize) and Thanks!, Kalli Niedoba, 2014 – Photo by Dennis Ha

Installation shot including Hold on, Untitled (smize) and Thanks!, Kalli Niedoba, 2014 – Photo by Dennis Ha

Big Beige Eyes is a solo exhibition of work by Kalli Niedoba inspired by the upscale beige-tinted interior of a Los Angeles branch of Citibank. The bank has invested in interior design as a means to orchestrate social order; The bank seeks to meet the goals of finance. As people line up, they are accounted for as customers of varying class standing – and a pseudo-democratic welcome desk stands waiting as an artifice of infrastructure.

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