Workers clean the Gassy Jack monument following an anti-racist protest demanding its removal, June 2020. Courtesy CBC

This crowd-sourced project, led by The Toronto chapter of  The Architecture Lobby, locates tangible spaces and objects within the territory known as Canada, represented by figures and events – be they political, social, economic, or otherwise – that have contributed to the dispossession of life, memory, territory, and resources of BIPOC communities, both past and present.

Contributor

221A is pleased to support the Toronto chapter of The Architecture Lobby’s Locating Colonial and Racist Spaces in “Canada”. This crowd-sourced project locates tangible spaces and objects within the territory known as Canada, represented by figures and events – be they political, social, economic, or otherwise – that have contributed to the dispossession of life, memory, territory, and resources of BIPOC communities, both past and present. Through an open and participatory process facilitated online, the project opens dialogue around specific territories in question and allows for public feedback on the conditions of current monuments, public buildings and lands. Further, it seeks to explore new methods for repatriation and creative strategies for addressing real harm caused to BIPOC communities. 

Spaces and objects that will be considered in this project range in a variety of scales in order to capture the pervasiveness of systemic racism. They include, but are not limited to: racist and colonial statues and places, communities displaced by urban renewal schemes, sites designed to suppress BIPOC communities, institutions who have relied on land grabs to accumulate their wealth, desecrated burial grounds, and places established through the dispossession of culturally-significant ecologies.  

Join us on Discord

Join us and The Architecture Lobby Toronto in developing the initial research phase by contributing to the dialogues and data capture taking place on 221A’s Discord server. There, we intend to build a community of solidarity among artists, designers, organizers, thinkers and critical voices who will shape this project and guide us towards a comprehensive understanding of the challenges ahead.

For those who may be new to Discord, Discord is a internet relay chat (IRC) like application for text and voice, originally developed and used by gamers, that has now been adopted by many IRL and online communities as an alternative online space which encourages greater depth of conversations, over the cacophony of clear-net social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. You can download the Discord app for free, or access the server channels through your web browser. You will be prompted to create an account.

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